Organization & Productivity, Entrepreneur

How to Work with a Fucking Newborn

Major disclaimer: please remember that this is just my version of working with a newborn. I’m under 30 and this is my only child, who we brought home through adoption (so my body didn’t physically have her). I run a successful (and profitable) business with a partner full time (we also have a small team). I have a life partner at home (baby daddy) who got 16 weeks paid leave, so I have also had his help. I won’t be referencing many timeframes in this post so you don’t beat yourself up if this isn’t your scenario. We’ll just be covering tips, tricks, strategies and mindsets that you can hopefully take away to make your worklife (with a newborn) a little easier.

In preparation for working from home once we our babe was here, I did a lot of Googling. I mostly found articles that said stuff like “work while she sleeps!”, “time block your tasks!” or “don’t expect to do anything for at least 4 months!”. I hated all of that advice.

In preparation for working from home once we our babe was here, I did a lot of Googling. I mostly found articles that said stuff like “work while she sleeps!”, “time block your tasks!” or “don’t expect to do anything for at least 4 months!”. I hated all of that advice.  First, let’s get real for a second. I’m freaking napping while she sleeps (especially in the early days) or staring at her or hosting yet another person who has chosen to stop by to meet her. The thought of hammering out a blog post at that time was laughable.  |  Think Creative Collective

First, let’s get real for a second. I’m freaking napping while she sleeps (especially in the early days) or staring at her or hosting yet another person who has chosen to stop by to meet her. The thought of hammering out a blog post at that time was laughable. Secondly, I’ve already said before that time blocking sucks, and it certainly didn’t change once I had a child. Thirdly, I love that my partner gets 16 weeks paid leave where he can just walk away and not think about work for 16 freaking weeks. That is not my life. That is not my reality. In order to keep an online business running, ya kind of can’t let it sit stagnant for 16 weeks.

So what’s a new parent to do?

Let’s start with a big fat dose of “take it day by day”. Look, there were days when our daughter was a freaking angel. She slept beautifully, she woke in an excellent mood, and she loved her independent time. I would look at these these good moments and think, “Man, she’s really getting the hang on life! She’s awesome!” And then 2 days later it would all come crashing down.

Babies cannot create a new normal that quickly. I realize that now. I’ve learned to hold off on my “call the presses celebrations” and wait it out for a hot minute. But when she was an angel, I took advantage of it like nobody’s business.

Now, let’s take it back a notch. We’re talking pre-baby here. Most of the relief that you’re going to get post-baby comes from what you can set up before. I already chatted about how to prepare for maternity leave, so be sure to check that post out if you still have time before your little one arrives (http://thinkcreativecollective.com/blog/how-to-prep-your-business-for-maternity-leave). I’ll be honest with you though, there are only so many blog posts / Instagram captions / automated emails that you can write beforehand. Your brain kind of goes to mush after about email 30 (not that I know what that feels like). But still, I really encourage you to go balls to the wall at this stage because you will thank yourself later.

Okay, back to the baby being here. What to do, when to do it, and how to continue to make it rain money.

Recognize that you will have a lull….but it doesn’t have to mean that you won’t make money. Listen, we both ended up taking leave (me for baby and Abagail for health reasons), so neither of us worked in our business in the entire month of January. We made about half the money that we did the month prior. And you know what? We threw ourselves a party.

How incredible that we can set systems up, let our team know what to do and step away and still make over $10k? Pretty incredible, that’s what.

If you want to know about all the automation tricks we put in place before we left, we lay all them out in our free program “Your Biz on Autopilot”.

So, let’s say you’ve gotten ahead as much as you can, you’ve set up some systems and maybe you’ve gotten yourself a VA. What now?

Prioritize, prioritize, prioritize.

Take a look at all the tasks you need to do and rank them. I don’t want you to go from biggest to smallest or whatever. Here’s what I want you to do instead: figure out your snowball effect. What tasks can you do that will help others things function / grow / bring in money? Do those first.

Maybe it’s setting up an opt-in box or finishing the sales page so it can go live or sending out emails to book guest bloggers. You have to multi-task your tasks. Consider every task as if it were a team member. What job does it do? What weight does it pull? If it’s just fluff, let it fall to the bottom of the pile.

Happy baby means a productive mama.

How or when is baby happiest? For us, she was happiest and most independent in the early hours (anytime between 5 am - 10 am). Anytime after that she was generally in between sleeps or only happy when she was being worn. So I organized my day around that. I could schedule quick calls, write blog posts or do any tasks that required strategic thinking in the early hours, but in the afternoon I needed to make sure I had help or I only scheduled tasks that didn’t mind the occasional cry or baby interruption.

Side note: Consider getting a standing desk. This is high on my wishlist right now, because girlfriend loves to stand. If I can squeeze in an extra hour of work just from wearing her standing, I’ll take it.

It’s okay if you work late. And it’s okay if you don’t.

One thing I had to really retrain myself on was the idea of working late. I had been building up this business over the last 1.5 years, and had been very proud of the fact that I hardly ever worked past 5 and never worked on the weekends. So in the first couple of weeks when I was sitting there wide awake at 10 or 11 PM, I adamantly refused to do any work out of principle — and weekends? Forget it. But I quickly realized that my days weren’t following a normal time schedule anyways, so it didn’t make that much sense to push so hard against working late. Any given time I couldn’t tell you what time it was or what day of the week it was (having a newborn is a lot like visiting Vegas it turns out), so why couldn’t I make up my own rules?

Here’s the catch though. There were plenty of times (there still are) when it is 11 PM and I’ve only worked maybe an hour all day and I should do something. But I just don’t want to. My brain is fried. Or I just want to hold her. Or I just want to binge on House Hunters. That’s okay too.

Have a circle of babes who get it.

I think this could be, hands down, the biggest support when it comes to getting work done. Find your people. And those people have to be parents. Try to have those people in the same boat as you business-wise also. Because, trust me, when it comes to complaining about the things you’re about to complain about, you want it to be in a room of people who support you. You’ll hear a whole bunch of “heck yes” and “girl, me too” and you’ll breath a little easier. It’s so easy to get caught up in the idea that you’re the only one feeling overwhelmed or like you can’t manage it at all. The comradery alone will keep you motivated.


I’d love to end this with disclaimer 2.0, but I think you get it. Every experience is different. Your babe might be a holy terror or a sweet baby angel. You truly never know. Your partner may step in like a pro and help out or they might need a full training session. It could go either way.

Give yourself some grace, but know that you can absolutely still kick ass in business. It may just look a little different.  



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Entrepreneur, Business

14 Noteworthy Podcasts Every Creative Female Entrepreneur Should Listen To

I haven’t always been a podcast junkie. In fact, my Dad is the only reason I ever even found out that podcasts existed. As a teenager, I remember the endless hours he would listen to his favorite shows and swore I would never been as geeky as him. Fast forward to owning an online business, and it quickly became apparent that podcasts were a great alternative way to learn.

As much as I loved writing for our blog, reading other blogs just never really seemed to fit into my schedule. But listening to a podcast could happen in the car, while putting on makeup, doing the dishes, or cleaning the house. Basically, it made all the boring parts of my life way more interesting.

I haven’t always been a podcast junkie. In fact, my Dad is the only reason I ever even found out that podcasts existed. As a teenager, I remember the endless hours he would listen to his favorite shows and swore I would never been as geeky as him. Fast forward to owning an online business, and it quickly became apparent that podcasts were a great alternative way to learn.  As much as I loved writing for our blog, reading other blogs just never really seemed to fit into my schedule. But listening to a podcast could happen in the car, while putting on makeup, doing the dishes, or cleaning the house. Basically, it made all the boring parts of my life way more interesting.  |  Think Creative Collective

Below, in no particular order, are a handpicked selection of a few of our favorite shows. Some are hardcore business, some are more chill and chatty and some are, well, murder mysteries, because Emylee likes true crime.

The Strategy Hour

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

This kind of goes without saying — I couldn’t write a post about podcasts without mentioning our own. After falling in love with the platform, we decided we had best just make our own. The Strategy Hour Podcast dishes out new episodes 3x a week, including in depth strategy for your business. We are talking true meat and potatoes here folks. We’ve had incredible guests like David Siteman Garland, Emily Ley, Nathan Barry and Ankur Nagpal. In fact, it was such a hit that we landed in the Top 15 in the Business category on iTunes in the first 24 hours! (HINT: You can find more amazing episodes by hitting PODCAST in the navigation above)

Smart Passive Income

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

Pat Flynn is kind of our man crush. He continues to bring on awesome guests who unlock complex strategies and lay it all out on a silver platter. He focuses heavily on passive income strategies that allow you to grow an online profitable and sustainable business, hence the name. Interested in our all time favorite takeaways and episodes? — You can hack your biz with Pat Flynn right here y’all.

Creative Empire

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

We might be partial because this podcast is also run by another stellar creative duo. Each week, Reina Pomeroy, the life + biz success coach at Reina + Co, and Christina Scalera, the attorney for creatives, chat with industry influencers to help you understand and develop the business side of your creative hustle. These girls are the real deal — you are definitely going to want to listen.

Being Boss

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

Well, apparently we like everything in twos. Being Boss is also run by another pair of ladies,  Emily Thompson and Kathleen Shannon. You’ll hear a lot fewer guests on their podcast, but we promise they won’t let you down. This isn’t just business all the time, sometimes it’s real life, it’s breaking rules, it may even get a little woo-woo. These girls got you.

Making Oprah

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

It’s no secret we are BIG Oprah fans, so when this little mini-series came out I was like — sign me up! You can finish ALL the episodes in a single afternoon, so this isn’t a long term commitment. Find out how Oprah got her start and learn exactly how she became one of the most powerful women in America! I liked this so much I think I will have to go back and listen to it all again.

Goal Digger

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

To be completely honest, I was skeptical about adding another podcast to my list, but this one surprised me. Jenna Kutcher is very transparent about the great and not so great parts of running an online business. You hear about her miscarriage, how she helped her husband work from home and her real fears. If you are looking for some mindset work, this may be a good go-to.

Creative Biz Rebellion

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

This podcast is totally different to the rest of the lineup, as it’s super specific to product based businesses. My good friends Kelly Parker Smith and Caroline Hull talk you through what it’s like to run an online shop and sell actual products. I seriously don’t know of any other podcast specializing in this sort of thing, so if you sell products or are thinking about it, then you need to know these ladies. Kelly and Caroline know their way around the online space, scaling from small part time hustle to multi-six figure businesses. They chat Etsy, Shopify and #alltheoptions — not to mention everything they know about shipping. Ok, I’ll stop, just go listen.

All Up In Your Lady Business

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

Jessica Stansberry and Jaclyn Mellone know how to make me laugh. These crazy co-hosts interview female entrepreneurs who are KILLING it, but these interviews are unlike anything you’ve heard before. We are talking full on giggle-fests, trying not to pee your pants, mom talk, baby problems, cows are in the middle of the road kind of interviews. And that, my friend, is just the tip of the iceberg. Sit back, grab some coffee (or some sweet tea) and catch up on the latest episodes.

EO Fire

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Are you ready to ignite? John Lee Dumas is literally a podcasting machine. With over 1500+ episodes and new episodes 7 days a week, this guy knows how to run an interview. And his guests, well, they are pretty top notch too! Hear from people like Seth Godin, Gary Vaynerchuk, Barbara Corcoran, Tim Ferris and so many more.

The Femtrepreneur Show

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

Mariah Coz and Megan Minns (yeah, I am really seeing a pattern here) host the The Femtrepreneur Show. This podcast is for ladies who want to create, launch and sell online courses (that’s us, see why we listen?)! They get into all the details of what it takes to run a successful online course business — how cool is that. They talk about list building, opt-ins, hiring help and so much more.

Young House Love Has a Podcast

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

Imagine your favorite DIY show, but in your pocket. This casual weekly show has conversations about DIY, design and life at home. It’s a nice break from business, business, business, all the time!

My Favorite Murder

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Ready yourself for a murder adventure hosted by Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark, two lifelong fans of true crime stories. Each episode, the girls tell each other their favorite tales of murder, and hear hometown crime stories from friends and fans. Check your anxiety at the door, 'cause Karen & Georgia are dying to discuss death.

In the Dark

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

For 27 years, the investigation into the abduction of Jacob Wetterling yielded no answers. Reporter Madeleine Baran reveals how law enforcement mishandled one of the most notorious child abductions in the country. Follow along as they reveal more evidence.

Undisclosed

Subscribe via iTunes  |  Stitcher

The Undisclosed podcast investigates wrongful convictions and the U.S. criminal justice system by taking a closer look at the perpetration of a crime, its investigation, the trial, and ultimate verdict... and finding new evidence that didn’t make it to court.



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Collaboration, Entrepreneur

5 Conversations to have Before Choosing a Business Partner

If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together. We know that heartfelt connections, strong relationships and soulful collaborations can transform a side hustle into a thriving small business. It’s hard being a solopreneur, and having someone to vent to, and brainstorm or celebrate with can help you accomplish twice as much. But taking the leap and committing to group work can be scary, so here are 5 conversations to have before choosing a business partner, so you can team up with confidence and success.

If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together. We know that heartfelt connections, strong relationships and soulful collaborations can transform a side hustle into a thriving small business. It’s hard being a solopreneur, and having someone to vent to, and brainstorm or celebrate with can help you accomplish twice as much. But taking the leap and committing to group work can be scary, so here are 5 conversations to have before choosing a business partner, so you can team up with confidence and success.   |  Think Creative Collective

Why should you choose a business partner?

If you’re lacking a specific talent or skillset that would benefit your clients, and you don’t want to spend the time or money developing that skill yourself, a business partner could fill the gap. If there’s an untouched audience that needs your services, a business partner could help you enter new markets and expand your reach. If you want to make more with less input, a business partner could be the extra mind and muscle that your bank account needs.

How to choose a business partner (and not totally regret it)

Don’t choose a business partner because you just “really like” a creative colleague, you’re lonely in business, or because it feels like everyone else is forming a creative clique, collective, or partnership. Form a business partnership because it will better serve your craft, your clients, your lifestyle and your bank account.

I believe that the best creations are collaborations, and that hard conversations can save you a lot of heartache. Here are five key discussions to have with a prospective business partner.

1. Talk about your personal life, including your schedules, relationships, and family.

Talk about your work routines, schedules, how you prefer to spend time off and what life is like away from the business. What does your prospective partner’s individual work/life blend look like? How does it match up to your own? What about your definition of work ethic? If you like to work 10-hour days, and your prospective partner only works 4-hour weeks, then that’s a difference you need to iron out before signing on the dotted line.

It’s also important to talk about your most influential relationships — what they’re like, where they’re going, and how you foresee them changing in the future. Brene Brown calls these your “one-inch square” people — the tiny, one-inch square of names on a piece of paper whose opinions you really care about. They are the stakeholders in your business and life — your spouse, children, siblings, employees, mentors, or most treasured clients. They have the power to influence whether you say “yay” or “nay” to a partnership or project, so their buy-in is essential to your success.

Are you thinking about getting married, divorced, having a baby or moving across the country? Talk through the big life moments that could impact your business and working dynamic.

Questions to ask:

  • What does your average work day look like?
  • Who in your life needs to be onboard with this partnership?
  • What would help your “one inch square” people feel more excited, supportive, or encouraged by this partnership?

2. Talk about the success you want (or don’t want any part of!)

Be honest about who you are, and truthful about who you never want to be. My business partner and I both want the same thing — to be working creatives that serve our clients and pay our bills. We don’t want seven-figure launches every month or an invite to interview with Oprah.

Get specific about what you’re willing to do for money, and what you’re not. It’s just as important to talk about the success you don’t want as it is to talk about the success you do.

Questions to ask:

  • What’s your current business model?
  • What services do you want to add, and what services do you want to retire?
  • Who is your business idol?
  • What does your ultimate “I made it” moment look like?
  • What version of “success” makes your stomach turn?
  • Do you want to grow into an agency, publication, or a larger platform in the future?

3. Talk about your strengths, weaknesses, big wins and train wrecks.

You can learn a lot about me by listening to my biggest success stories. You can learn even more from my biggest failures, setbacks, and obstacles. When a client was fuming, I began to BCC my prospective partner. I wanted her to see how I handled the situation. If she appreciated the way I spoke to the client, was impressed by my problem solving, and thought I resolved the issue professionally, she could trust me to represent her in a partnership.

If you’re afraid to show someone the good, bad, and ugly of your experiences, then you may not be ready for a partnership, or they may not be the right partner for you. Strive for someone whose integrity you trust, completely.

Questions to ask:

  • How do you handle difficult or upset clients?
  • Have you ever had to refund a client?
  • Have you ever had to dissolve a partnership or working agreement?
  • What is your favorite kind of work?
  • What tasks do you hate doing?
  • How to do celebrate wins?
  • What are you best at?

4. Talk about how much money you make.

Are you and your prospective business partner making the same salary? I teamed up with someone making the same money I was, in the same ways — as a contractor for larger agencies and art directors. Because we had a similar starting point, it was easy to project our future salary goals.

If you aren’t making a similar salary — and your prospective partner requires a dramatically different-looking paycheck every month to make her rent — you’ll need to spend extra time doing some financial planning for the business. Nothing is a deal breaker, but everything is up for discussion.

Questions to ask:

  • What’s your dream salary?
  • How much do you need to make a month?
  • How do you determine prices for your services?
  • Is giving back a part of your business model?
  • What are your one-to-one offerings?
  • What are you selling one-to-many?
  • What services or offerings make you the most money?
  • What’s services or offerings are costing you money?
  • Which business investments are most important to you? Travel, education, systems?

5. Talk about the worst case scenario.

What happens if you get sued? If someone quits, dies, or wants to dissolve business? Who gets the money, assets, clients and the newsletter list if you part ways? The best time to talk about the worst case scenario is before it happens. You don’t need to spend big money on a lawyer, but you should ask hard questions and write up a working agreement that you both can sign with confidence and clarity.

Questions to ask:

  • How do you build trust with the people you work with?
  • How will we split the revenue?
  • What happens if one of us wants to take a temporary break from the business?

A business partnership is not at all unlike a marriage, and creative partnerships are notoriously complex. You’re going to disagree, fall down, fall apart, and rally together in amazing and unexpected ways. But if you establish a foundation of trust and integrity in the honeymoon phase, you’re more likely to go the distance and live (and work!) happily ever after.



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Video Tutorial, Canva

How to Batch Five Graphics in Five Minutes

One of the things I hear a lot as a Canva Designer is that people feel stuck on ideas for their graphics, and want to know how to create great looking graphics faster.

Well, the last thing I want you to do is reinvent the wheel every single time you sit down to create your graphics.

So, if you’re feeling creatively stuck with your visuals, then today’s training is perfect for you. I want to show you how to approach one visual and use that “style” to batch the rest of your graphics so you can save time and feel great about your visuals.

One of the things I hear a lot as a Canva Designer is that people feel stuck on ideas for their graphics, and want to know how to create great looking graphics faster. Well, the last thing I want you to do is reinvent the wheel every single time you sit down to create your graphics. So, if you’re feeling creatively stuck with your visuals, then today’s training is perfect for you. I want to show you how to approach one visual and use that “style” to batch the rest of your graphics so you can save time and feel great about your visuals.  |  Think Creative Collective

In this training, you’ll learn:

  • How to create a “design recipe” by using your brand elements
  • How to repeat that concept for all of your other graphics
  • How to save time and simplify batching graphics for your biz, and
  • How to create a consistent look and feel with your visuals.

I start off by creating one image for my blog post, and let that image inspire the rest of the images needed to promote my post.

1. CREATE A BLOG OR PINTEREST IMAGE (00:54)

Whether you’re starting from scratch or working from a preset template, remember to add visual cues and concepts that your readers are accustomed to seeing on your online spaces.

In the video, you can see how I mimic the basic layout of my Recipe Book Training to create a custom Pinterest image that “matches”.

2. A FACEBOOK POST IMAGE (02:10)

You can use Canva for Work’s Magic Resize feature to create duplicate images in different sizes (see first image below), or you can “drag” your new design into your preset template and adjust the design accordingly. Simply got to, Layouts > All your designs > and find the Pinterest post image you just created. Drag it into your new design and adjust (see second image below).

Both options are a great way to save time. I usually go with option two, as I want to make sure all my graphics look consistent with the my existing images for that platform.

3. A CONTENT UPGRADE IMAGE (03:11)

You’ll see me follow the same steps as I do with the previous image, making it easier to create a consistent look for all of my graphics. And, because I’m creating them all in one work session, I can easily see how they’ll “fit” together, and which images need to be adapted slightly so that they don’t all look the same.

You can easily do this by swapping out your background image for a plain color or changing out the main color for an accent color.

4. AN INSTAGRAM POST (03:39)

Your Instagram image is going to depend on your visual strategy for Instagram. You could do lifestyle shots with images for tips and videos in between (like I do here), or you could use the same image for Instagram as you use on your blog post (like Think Creative Collective does). Do what works for you (and your brand) and do what is easy to stick with.

5. MOCK UP IMAGE (03:51)

A mock up image is an easy and versatile image to promote your post on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook or Pinterest. See  How to use Canva to create your Product Mockups to make your own profesh looking mock ups.

And there you have it, babe. Five image ideas to promote your next blog post in just a few short minutes.

As I mention in the training, it helps when you create your images around a central theme. It will also save you heaps of time and frustration if you create them all at once.

If you’d like to feel super fancy and have your very own personalized Canva templates to play with, visit NicholetteStyles.com and poke around in the options available. You can also send me a note here.



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Profitability, Formulas & Strategies

4 Methods to Talk About Price Increases With Your Clients

The best and the worst thing that you can go through as a biz owner is raising your prices. It's awesome, because it means that your business is growing, but it always has the potential to be super awkward and uncomfortable when you need to have a “the price is going up” conversation with your repeat clients. Here are some super simple ways for you to handle a price increase with your clients in a way that will make them love you more than ever.

The best and the worst thing that you can go through as a biz owner is raising your prices. It's awesome, because it means that your business is growing, but it always has the potential to be super awkward and uncomfortable when you need to have a “the price is going up” conversation with your repeat clients. Here are some super simple ways for you to handle a price increase with your clients in a way that will make them love you more than ever.  |  Think Creative Collective

Methods to Deal

"THE FINE PRINT"

There are probably a few places on your website or in your print materials where you could insert some fine print outlining and allowing for any future price increases. This will give you the opportunity, as a business owner, to be able to change your prices at the drop of a hat (with a simple acknowledgement of your fine print). The downside of this course of action is that most clients do not read the fine print. At some point, you're probably still going to have to actually speak to clients about the increase. However, the bonus is being able to fall back on what the "fine print" says.

For example:

“As outlined in the 2016 Pricing Guide, the current price of X will be increasing at the beginning of next month.”

Having it worded like the example above takes a little pressure off you, and lets you take emotions out of the decision. Instead, it becomes an anticipated business move.

"THE LAST MINUTE OPPORTUNITY"

Portraying your soon-to-be price increase almost as a last minute "sale" can help you move some items out the door or book up the last few slots you still have open. If set up properly, your clients will hopefully feel as though they are getting a great deal (and equally, will be aware of your new prices).

For example:

“Snag your favorite images as a canvas before prices rise! Get them while they’re only $X!”

Regardless of whether you're raising the prices on canvases or tote bags, this method always helps to get a large amount of orders placed. Clients appreciate the heads up and the reminder to snag their favorite items. The exact same thing can be done for those of you who offer services. Run a similar “promotion” on your 1:1 coaching, your social media consults or Pinterest Board clean ups to fill spots up quickly.

"THE HONOR SYSTEM"

One question that frequently pops up is how to handle people who have shown interest in or booked you when you were at a certain price, but maybe weren't scheduled to work with you until after you've raised your prices. Personally, when we were taking clients and they had  actually booked (like money on the table), we honored every single price that was set at that time — even if they didn't know what all the prices were. So, for instance, we've had past clients pay our session retainer fee at the end of one year even though their session wasn’t until the spring of next year. If, at that time, prices for our packages, services or anything else had gone up, they still got the old prices. It's what we call the honor system, and it's one of the ways in which we showed our clients love.

However, if a not-yet-booked client expressed interest in us and we talked briefly about prices but they didn’t actually schedule anything, we would charge the newly-increased price. If they returned to us some months later, once prices had increased, they started the entire process over again.

For example:

“As we’ve recently restructured our packages and offerings, we’d like to go over all of this with you as if you were a brand new client.”

Wording it like the example above forces any awkwardness out the window and makes it very clear where you stand. Plus, they’re most likely getting a totally reworked or better system with you so it’s a win-win situation.

"THE ANNUAL"

We know a bunch of businesses that have an annual rise in their prices, usually in January of every year. They are very open about this to their clients, and may even reference it throughout the year. It reassures clients that prices will remain the same throughout the calendar year, but it also makes them very aware of future business decisions. This also helps to set your business as "premium", since your clients are aware of the yearly price increase.

For example:

“Every January we reassess our offerings, at which time there will most likely be a price increase. Book your services now to lock into the current rate.”

This example also helps to create a sense of urgency, which pushes potential fence-sitters to go ahead and book with you.


No matter which of these methods you choose, always try to be open as possible with your clients about prices and fees. There’s no reason to apologize or be sneaky about how much you are worth. The more open you are, the easier these conversations are to have — and trust us, it gets so much easier over time!


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