Entrepreneur, Organization & Productivity

How to Get Your Kids Involved When You Work from Home

When I started my business, I knew that my daughter, Olivia, would be involved somehow. I had always included her in “big girl” things (age appropriately, of course!). She was my little sidekick, so I ended up naming the company after her. Over the years, I have been surprised by how much of the business she has been interested in. She has learned so much from being involved, and I am here to encourage you to involve your kids in your business, too.

When I started my business, I knew that my daughter, Olivia, would be involved somehow. I had always included her in “big girl” things (age appropriately, of course!). She was my little sidekick, so I ended up naming the company after her. Over the years, I have been surprised by how much of the business she has been interested in. She has learned so much from being involved, and I am here to encourage you to involve your kids in your business, too. | Think Creative Collective

When you allow your children to get involved in your business, they learn so much more than just the task at hand. They learn…

  • goal setting
  • real life applications of school lessons
  • accountability
  • interpersonal skills
  • work ethic
  • inspiration to create their own path
  • problem solving skills
  • the direct relationship between work and reward.

As a bonus, we the parents get the benefit of seeing our children in a different light. We get to see their little brains processing new information, problem-solving, and dreaming big. This proud mama’s heart swells when seeing Olivia’s reaction to success!

The tasks you can hand over to your children differ depending on their age levels. At younger ages, your child will perform tasks alongside you. Guide them in their decision making and explain tasks one step at a time. As they grow older, you will be able to hand off tasks for them to complete more independently. Ultimately, you know your child best, and know better than anyone else what they can handle. So, use your own judgement when assigning tasks. Here are some ideas for you!

2-4 Years Old

  • Pack outgoing orders
  • Open incoming packages
  • Tidy up the office – simple tasks with supervision
  • Count supplies and inventory

4-6 Years Old

  • Tidy up the office –  increasingly complex tasks
  • Fill orders by pulling products off the shelf
  • Put shipments and materials away in the correct spots
  • Organize your paper pile by receipt, invoice, etc. (Give them an example of each type of document and have them sort the pile.)
  • Stuff envelopes for mailings
  • Gather materials for projects

6-9 Years Old

  • File and shred paperwork
  • Add up receipts
  • Brainstorm ideas for new products
  • Name new products
  • Style photoshoots
  • Set up and tear down displays and sales tables

9-12 Years Old

  • Take notes from phone calls (simple at first, increasing in complexity with age and experience)
  • Greet guests and give handouts at meetings or conferences
  • Assemble products
  • Send emails
  • Take photos of products

12+ Years Old

  • Answer phones and take messages
  • Simple photo cropping and graphic design
  • Schedule social media posts
  • Techie tasks and problems
  • Transcribe document

It is important to me for my kids to see me work. It is extremely important for them to see the direct relationship between work and the reward, payment, or even just the sense of accomplishment for completing a project. As Olivia gets older, I will involve her more and more in my business. I will even take her along to conferences so she can see the larger picture of our industry. Someday, when I am the one speaking on the stage, she will beam up at me and know she was an instrumental part of our success.


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